Inside Bougainville – New Documentary by Clive Porabou

[ed: Clive’s community on Bougainville will soon be a Direct Sponsor project, and our priority is to sort out their internet problems so that they can communicate with the world better]

‘Inside Bougainville’ is a new film by local filmmaker Clive Porabou founder of Eel films. It follows on from his previous films bringing voices and culture from Bougainville to the world intertwined with the ongoing issues of mining and independence with reconciliation and custom. The objective of this funding campaign is to support Eel films toward finishing and touring the film.

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Schools Revert to Ethernet Over Health Fears

i_love_microwavesIn a rare example of the precautionary principle, the Mayor of Borgofranco d’Ivrea in Piedmont, Italy has ordered two schools to use ethernet instead of wireless. While there may still be some doubt about the extent of damage to children’s health by microwaves there can be no doubt at all about the lack of logic in the “arguments” of the angry townspeople and councillors.

It’s important for us to act now before the transfer to wi-fi only is complete in our devices, and there is no alternative. At the moment, even an iPhone or iPad can be connected to ethernet, albeit somewhat clumsily and expensively. If the industry continues on its current path, that option will be gone in a few years.

Here’s the article at thelocal.it.
and archived as a pdf: town shuts down Wi-Fi over health fears

Rural DIY Internet in Greece

A community in a remote mountainous area of Greece has created its own access to the internet via a wireless mesh network. As well as serving the local people, free wi-fi is available for visitors. This is a truly autonomous network. When something goes wrong, people work together to fix it. It’s helping to bring together a widely dispersed people.

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Facebook to Suck Profit From World’s Poor

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To view the mainstream media reports and the publicity from internet.org may give the impression that Zuckerberg is doing something laudable, providing “internet” access for free to poor people. Digging deeper only encounters obstruction by way of weasel-worded vagueness about the actual services provided.

To be honest, I only spent a couple of hours researching this. Time is precious and wasting too much of it chasing the plans of megalomaniac control freaks has only limited value. We just have to continue building our own alternatives and trying to wake people up to the fake replacements of real things we are being fobbed off with. Don’t  blame Zuckerberg, he’s just being a greedy parasite as is his nature. It’s up to us to thwart his efforts to bend our world to benefit him at our expense.

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US island residents create own internet service

island internet
West coast US view from Orcas Island

The community of Doe Bay, Orcas Island, off the Washington coast, have set up their own internet service, with antennas in trees. Using a directional microwave link to the mainland (10 miles), and a lot of shorter links and relays, the network now supplies around 50 residents with 30-40 Mb synchronous connections.

“This has been a total grassroots effort,” explained Chris Sutton, DBIUA co- founder and board member. “We’re neighbors helping neighbors. The Doe Bay community repeatedly asked our local Internet service providers for better service; we received no solid answers or solutions. So, in the tradition of Doe Bay’s pioneer spirit, we rolled up our sleeves and did it ourselves.”

Here’s their website: http://dbiua.org/

More in the video below.

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Drinking Water Out of a Billboard in Peru

 

LIMA – Peru’s University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC) was about to open the applications for the period 2013, so they needed to get students’ attention. Lima, the capital, and its surrounding villages such as Bujama are located in the coastal deserts of Peru. In these places, there were many people suffering from the lack of clean and potable water.
The rain in this region is almost zero, but its atmospheric humidity is about 98%. Inspired by this, UTEC built the first billboard that produces drinking water out of the air. The billboard has unique technology that captures the air humidity and turns it into drinking water. The billboard has already produced about 2,496.42 gallons of drinking water in a 3 month period, an amount that equals the water consumption of hundreds of families per month.

Read more in the full article here.
Archived as .pdf Peru_Drinking_Water

Why We Should All Switch Back To Ethernet.

While the proliferation of wireless devices has made accessing the internet more convenient and less obtrusive (no unsightly cables lying around), studies are now revealing the trade-offs that come with convenience. More specifically, the dangers that the widespread adoption of wireless technology has created in regards to our health. Simply put, most people underestimate the dangers of wireless technology to our health and well-being.

Read more at naturalnews.com

Archived as pdf: Why_we_should_all_switch_back_to_ethernet

Wireless Link for Mfangano Island in Kenya

http://www.inveneo.org/2012/08/90km-wireless-link-for-mfangano-island/

Mfangano Island now has a 1Mbps Internet connection. For those of you reading this over a high-speed cable, DSL, or fiber connection in a developed country this may not sound terribly impressive. However, when you consider the four major challenges we had to overcome to bring this meg of data to a remote island nestled at the mouth of Winam Gulf in Lake Victoria, you might think again as to the level of this accomplishment.

A small local NGO that had never before worked in the telecom space had to figure out how to design and build a tower that could be welded by local craftsmen to tight technical specifications. The tower they built supports one end of a 90km wireless link (60% of which is over water), pushing the limits of long-distance WiFi’s capabilities. The whole operation is powered by a hybrid solar/wind electrical system, because no other power is available at the tower site.

Finally, every single piece of equipment required to put this all together had to be ferried to the island in a small wooden boat and hand carried up a grueling two hour hike.

More on the inveneo.org site.

Water for Africa

Real help for Africans

We’ve seen how governments and agencies are willing to spend billions of taxpayers dollars to fund the dumping of obsolete “AIDS drugs” on the African continent. Bill Gates, who has been moving his vast fortune out of software and into a portfolio pharmaceutical companies before the bottom falls out of Microsoft, is a huge booster for testing experimental drugs on Africans.

While these ghouls “give” billions as part of a mission to turn Africa into a colony of the pharmaceutical industry, PlayPumps has a better idea. Why not make it easy for rural Africans to get access to clean water? As demonstrated in the West not much more than 100 years ago, when clean water is made available to a population, they become healthier and their life span and productivity increases.

This technology is ingenious and it demonstrates how easy it is to solve the real problems of the world – if the “philanthropists” actually care about helping.

For more info on this brilliant initiative:

http://www.PlayPumps.org

Thanks to http://www.brasschecktv.com/

Given Tablets but No Teachers, Ethiopian Children Teach Themselves

Tablet test: Nicholas Negroponte, founder of One Laptop Per Child, describes experiments involving children in Ethiopia at MIT Technology Review’s EmTech conference.

With 100 million first-grade-aged children worldwide having no access to schooling, the One Laptop Per Child organization is trying something new in two remote Ethiopian villages—simply dropping off tablet computers with preloaded programs and seeing what happens.

The goal: to see if illiterate kids with no previous exposure to written words can learn how to read all by themselves, by experimenting with the tablet and its preloaded alphabet-training games, e-books, movies, cartoons, paintings, and other programs.

Early observations are encouraging, said Nicholas Negroponte, OLPC’s founder, at MIT Technology Review’s EmTech conference last week.

Read more at technologyreview.com