Couple Transforms Destroyed Farmlands In India Into Wildlife Sanctuaries

for2-400x225For those seeking inspiration even though they have been told that one person can’t make a difference, look no further. This is actually a story about a couple who followed their passion for rehabilitating land, wildlife, and the fresh water supply in India despite the odds being stacked against them. Anil and Pamela Malhotra first […]

Source: Couple Buys Destroyed Farmlands In India And Naturally Transforms Them Into Wildlife Sanctuaries

Trees Make Rain VII – Even the scientists are beginning to figure it out.

In a Guardian article we’re warned that the “Amazon rainforest is losing ability to regulate climate

Despite ‘careful’ phrasing, this article and the research it refers to is very useful support for the notion that we need more forests if we are to survive here for much longer. Big Pharma and its mainstream ‘medicine’ lackeys can make all kinds of definitive claims about their particular brands of snake oil, but when one is challenging the onslaught of progress one has to use careful language:

the deterioration of the rainforest – through logging, fires and land clearance – has resulted in a decrease in forest transpiration and a lengthening of dry seasons. This might be one of the factors of the severe drought affecting south-east Brazil.

In fairness, this and other examples of cowardly deference to corporate masters might (!) be coming from the reporter, not the author of the study. In any case, the article has some interesting insights into how mainstream science has been separated from reality:

…science has become so fragmented. Atmospheric scientists don’t look at forests as much as they should and vice versa,” said Nobre, who wrote the report for a lay audience. [when you look into the abyss…?]

Full article in the link above, and archived as pdf here: Amazon_losing_ability_to_regulate_climate

p.s. Of course, saying that it might be one of the factors,the author may have been thinking of HAARP weather weapons as another factor, but it’s unlikely!

Trees Make Rain VI – Biologic Origin of Snowflakes and Raindrops

In Trees Make Rain V we saw how trees enable microbes to put just the right kind of particles in the air to make it rain. It turns out that these are the most productive of all three known types of nucleating particles:

  1.  Meteor dust particles, which serve as ice nucleators mostly at temperatures colder than -15 degrees Celsius);
  2. Inorganic soil particles (mainly clays), which also serve as ice nucleators mostly at temperatures colder than -15 degrees Celsius; and
  3. Biological particles, which serve as ice nucleators temperatures as warm as, or warmer than, -5 degrees Celsius.

This is shown in detail in a paper called “The Biologic Origin of Snowflakes and Raindrops” by the Suburban Emergency Management Project.

The most active ice nucleators are biological in origin, declare Christner, et al. in their paper recently published in Science (February 29, 2008). (11) “This is important because the formation of ice in clouds is required for snow and most rainfall. Dust and soot particles can serve as ice nuclei, but biological ice nuclei are capable of catalyzing freezing at much warmer temperatures”, the researchers explain. (14) In other words, a mechanism exists whereby snowflakes and other precipitation can form when cloud temperatures in the troposphere are relatively warm.

Here’s the link, http://www.nonaiswa.org/wordpress/orgin-of-the-snowflakes/

and archived as a pdf: The_Biologic_Origin_of_Snowflakes_and_Raindrops

and here’s the referenced article (11): Ubiquity of Biological Ice Nucleators in Snowfall

See also Evidence for biological shaping of hair ice (pdf, archived here:  bg-12-4261-2015)
and a related article: From rain clouds to ‘hair ice’: how microscopic organisms engineer Earth’s climate
archived here: microscopic_organisms_engineer_climate.pdf

Trees Make Rain V – Uncovering the tricks of nature’s ice-seeding bacteria

64028_webLike the Marvel Comics superhero Iceman, some bacteria have harnessed frozen water as a weapon. Species such as Pseudomonas syringae have special proteins embedded in their outer membranes that help ice crystals form, and they use them to trigger frost formation at warmer than normal temperatures on plants, later invading through the damaged tissue. When the bacteria die, many of the proteins are wafted up into the atmosphere, where they can alter the weather by seeding clouds and precipitation.

Now scientists from Germany have observed for the first time the step-by-step, microscopic-level action of P. syringae‘s ice-nucleating proteins locking water molecules in place to form ice. More in the full article:

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/aiop-utt102313.php

Archived as pdf here: Uncovering the tricks of nature’s ice-seeding bacteria

Trees Make Rain IV – Biotic Pump

mamberamo from the airIf you cut your forest, the winds will not blow from the ocean and will not bring you rain. Natural forests draw atmospheric moisture inland from the ocean in a positive feedback loop. This builds up precipitation inland, compensating for water lost through river flow and ultimately increasing river runoff due to the sustained low pressure area inland. Forests make rivers.

Much more at bioticregulation.ru

Archived here: Biotic_Pump.pdf

Love vs. Fear

Imagine if we could help someone change their life for the better permanently, in under three years. Or imagine being in direct contact with the people on the ground, turning their semi-desert home back to an abundant food forest using permaculture, perhaps even going over and helping out…. Imagine being able to offer advice and expertise, or just encouragement and support, while a family solves their problems. No middlemen, no expenses taken out, no bureaucracy. If only!

After spending some years and a lot of money (to me) trying to set up a conventional non-profit to promote permaculture, I came across an alarming and incredible statistic, one which caused me to reappraise everything I was doing and start something else. According to statista.com, in the USA alone, non-profits reported expenses of 1.89 trillion U.S. dollars in 2009. I wanted to be sure, because sometimes a billion is a hundred million, instead of a thousand million (presumably to distinguish top millionaires from the riffraff). But that’s not the case here. A trillion is a one followed by 12 zeros, so in 2009, US non-profits’ expenses were 1,890,000,000,000 dollars.

And that’s just the USA. We could safely double it for worldwide non-profits, and still be well below the actual figure. To be conservative, let’s say 3 trillion of our dollars each year goes on the kinds of projects that non-profits are allowed to do (essentially, making the world a better place). Think what you could do with just one million dollars. Now think of that times three million! Or imagine if three million people went out into the world, each with a million dollars to spend on projects beneficial to the community. Every year!

 

Read the rest at permaculturenews.org

Non-native species – introduce with care!

We tend to get carried away, impressed by our knowledge, while forgetting that what we don’t know is vastly greater than what we do. We introduce non-native species to an area because, in another part of the world, they do something we like. What’s quoted below is from the book “The Vegetarian Myth” by Lierre Keith. She goes into great detail about the lives of plants and this gives us an insight into just how ignorant we are about the intricacies of ecosystems.

We have to understand that the permaculture designs we make are but a pale imitation of the real world; a vastly simplified system designed to provide food for us. We should approach this with humility and care. The quotes within the text are from a book called “The Lost Language of Plants” by Stephen Harrod Buhner.

Buhner talks about archipelagoes of plant communities, groupings of intercommunicating plants around a dominant or keystone species, usually a tree. These archipelagoes form in response to mysterious and unpredictable cues, and often announce the wholesale movement of ecosystems. The process begins with an outrider or pioneer plant, who literally prepares the soil for its cohorts. When the soil is ready, the nurse plant sends out the chemical message: join me. What happens next is astounding.  Continue reading “Non-native species – introduce with care!”

Indian Man Single-Handedly Plants a 1,360 Acre Forest

A little over 30 years ago, a teenager named Jadav “Molai” Payeng began burying seeds along a barren sandbar near his birthplace in northern India’s Assam region to grow a refuge for wildlife. Not long after, he decided to dedicate his life to this endeavor, so he moved to the site where he could work full-time creating a lush new forest ecosystem. Incredibly, the spot today hosts a sprawling 1,360 acre of jungle that Payeng planted single-handedly.

The Times of India recently caught up with Payeng in his remote forest lodge to learn more about how he came to leave such an indelible mark on the landscape:

See more on the Times of India site. (saved as pdf here: The man who made a forest – Times Of India)

Fewer trees, less rain: study uncovers deforestation equation

(2005) Australian scientists say they have found proof that cutting down forests reduces rainfall. The finding, independent of previous anecdotal evidence and computer modelling, uses physics and chemistry to show how the climate changes when forests are lost, by analyzing variations in the molecular structure of rain along the Amazon River.

Not all water, Professor Henderson-Sellers said, was made from the recipe of two atoms of “common” hydrogen and one of “regular” oxygen. About one in every 500 water molecules had its second hydrogen atom replaced by a heavier version called deuterium. And one in every 6500 molecules included a heavy version of the oxygen atom.

Knowing the ratio allowed scientists to trace the Amazon’s water as it flowed into the Atlantic, evaporated, blew back inland with the trade winds to fall again as rain, and finally returned to the river. The study showed that since the 1970s the ratio of the heavy molecules found in rain over the Amazon and the Andes had declined significantly. The only possible explanation was that they were no longer being returned to the atmosphere to fall again as rain because the vegetation was disappearing. “With many trees now gone and the forest degraded, the moisture that reaches the Andes has clearly lost the heavy isotopes that used to be recycled so effectively,” Professor Henderson-Sellers said.

“This is the first demonstration that deforestation has an observable impact on rainfall.”

Original article (sydney morning herald)

(saved version: Fewer trees, less rain)