New Documentary: Mining Not Necessary on Bougainville

One of Bougainville’s leading film-makers says the island would be better off without mining.

After 25 years, moves are afoot to re-open the Rio Tinto-owned Panguna copper mine and PNG’s Prime Minister Peter O’Neill is due to make a much-postponed visit to the autonomous region next week. Jemima Garrett has been getting a sneak preview of Clive Porabou’s new doco ‘After the War’.
Read more and hear the broadcast on the the Radio Australia website.

Prince Harry Charity in boarding school fees scandal

pigs-at-the-troughOne of Britain’s biggest charities, whose patron is Prince Harry, has used hundreds of thousands of pounds of donors’ money to pay the boarding school fees of its chief executive’s children. The Halo Trust, whose trustees include the actress Angelina Jolie, has sanctioned the payment of tens of thousands of pounds a year for more than a decade to fund the private education of Guy Willoughby’s four children.

Most importantly, the practice has been in place at Halo for more than a decade although no mention is made of the arrangement in the charity’s accounts or on its website. This shows the need for fully open accounting, which we should be demanding before giving any money out at all.

More in the Telegraph article here

Archived as pdf: Charity_school_fees_scandal

Message to the African Wildlife Foundation

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/52192689]Nakuru Lemiruni sends a message to those responsible for evicting the Samburu tribe from their land..

The Samburu of Kisargei, in Kenya’s Laikipia district, were brutally evicted from the lands they call home in 2010 after the land was sold to the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF). AWF, using funds from The Nature Conservancy (TNC), says it bought the land on the understanding that no-one lived there. When the Samburu protested and took the matter to the courts the land was hurriedly ‘gifted’ to the government.

Police chose a Friday “market day” for their attack, when the men were away and only women, elders, and children were in their homes. Fanning out across the 17,000- acre Eland Downs Ranch, police burned the Samburu families’ homes to the ground, along with all their possessions.

Identified in the Kenyan press as “squatters,” the evicted Samburu families petitioned a regional court to recognize their ancestral claims to the land where they lived and grazed their cattle The suit has been filed by the Samburu against the African Wildlife Foundation and the former President.They need money and public support to win.